Hiroyuko Yamamoto, a crossing guard in Matsudo, Japan, has been trained in how to recognize and gently approach people who are wandering, or have other signs of dementia, in ways that won't frighten them. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Japanese City Takes Community Approach To Dealing With Dementia

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Parkinson's disease, smoking, certain head injuries and even normal aging can influence our sense of smell. But certain patterns of loss in the ability to identify odors seem pronounced in Alzheimer's, researchers say. CSA Images/Color Printstock Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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A Sniff Test For Alzheimer's Checks For The Ability To Identify Odors

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A lucky few stay healthy despite carrying genetic defects linked to serious diseases. What protects them? Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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How Do 'Genetic Superheroes' Overcome Their Bad DNA?

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Teresa Valko and her mother, Evelyn Wilson, in 2011. Courtesy of Teresa Valko hide caption

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Conversations Turn Into Monologues As Alzheimer's Robs Family Of Memories

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A New York study found that getting medical students together with dementia patients and their families at museums to view, discuss and create art for 90 minutes made the students better communicators. Colin Hawkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite losing his sense of taste and smell to Alzheimer's disease, Greg O'Brien says grilling supper on the back deck with his son on a summer evening is still fun. Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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When Alzheimer's Steals Your Appetite, Remember To Laugh

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Giedre (left) and Tal Cohen in March 2013, while Giedre was still healthy. Since then, she's begun having symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In Giedre's case, the illness is tied to a rare genetic mutation she inherited. Courtesy of Tal Cohen hide caption

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Younger Adults With Alzheimer's Are Key To Drug Search

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In this colorized image of a brain cell from a person with Alzheimer's, the red tangle in the yellow cell body is a toxic tangle of misfolded "tau" proteins, adjacent to the cell's green nucleus. Thomas Deerinck/NCMIR/Science Source hide caption

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Alzheimer's Drugs In The Works Might Treat Other Diseases, Too

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Greg O'Brien and his wife are finding it more difficult to drive to and from their family's secluded house on Cape Cod. As they move out and move on, O'Brien has discovered a bittersweet trove of memories. Sam Broun/Courtesy of Greg O'Brien hide caption

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When Losing Memory Means Losing Home

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How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

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Seeing What Isn't There: Inside Alzheimer's Hallucinations

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The Allen Institute for Brain Science hosted its first BigNeuron Hackathon in Beijing earlier this month. Similar events are planned for the U.S. and U.K. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Hackers Teach Computers To Tell Healthy And Sick Brain Cells Apart

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When combined with results of other neurological tests, and in the context of a thorough medical history, atrophy of the brain (shown here in an MRI scan) sometimes indicates Alzheimer's. Simon Fraser/Science Source hide caption

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Many Doctors Who Diagnose Alzheimer's Fail To Tell The Patient

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Laury Sacks and her husband, Eric. The actress and writer developed frontotemporal dementia in her late 40s and died in 2008 at age 52. Courtesy of Eric Sacks hide caption

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Prion protein can be infectious, spreading from cell to cell in the brain. Here four nerve cells in a mouse illustrate how infectious prion protein moves within cells along neurites — wire-like connections the nerve cells use for communicating with adjacent cells. Science Source hide caption

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Mad Cow Research Hints At Ways To Halt Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

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