The PharmaChk is a bit like a litmus test for drugs: You pop in a pill at one end, and in 15 minutes, a number appears on a screen telling you the drug's potency. Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR hide caption

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Chemist Facundo Fernandez of the Georgia Institute of Technology tested morning-after pills collected from 15 different pharmacies in Lima, Peru. Rob Felt/Georgia Tech hide caption

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Shoppers buy smuggled counterfeit drugs at the Adjame market in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, in 2007. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In rural areas of Myanmar, villagers can buy inexpensive packets of drugs, called Ya Chut, when they have malaria. But these local remedies often don't contain adequate amounts of malaria medicines. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Fake Malaria Drugs Fuel Rise Of Drug-Resistant Disease
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