The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, which causes MERS, is one of the microbes that has sparked research controversy. NIAID/CDC hide caption

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Debate Over Bird Flu Research Moratorium Flares Up Again

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A gate blocks the entrance of a farm operated by Daybreak Foods, on May 17, 2015 near Eagle Grove, Iowa. The facility was reportedly struck by the current outbreak of bird flu. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsick says biosecurity measures are crucial to containing the spread of the disease, which has only infected birds, not humans. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary Of Agriculture: Bird Flu Poses 'No Health Issue' To Humans

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Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

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Biohazard suits used to handle dangerous microbes hang in a laboratory at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Fort Detrick, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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An outbreak of bird flu in India in 2008 prompted authorities to temporarily ban the sale of poultry. Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Biologists Choose Sides In Safety Debate Over Lab-Made Pathogens

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Particles of H5N1 virus — a particularly dangerous type of bird flu that can infect people — attack lung cells. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Feds Tighten Lab Security After Anthrax, Bird Flu Blunders

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Street vendors sell chickens at a market in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in early 2013. Last year Cambodia reported more cases of H5N1 bird flu than any other country. Mak Remissa/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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A vendor sells chickens at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last month. As a precautionary measure against the deadly H7N9 virus, Hong Kong has temporarily stopped importing poultry from mainland farms. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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Some scientists think new types of bird flus should arise only in chickens, not in labs. Here a worker collects poultry on a farm in Kathmandu, Nepal, where the H5N1 virus was infecting animals in October 2011. Prakas Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man who just recovered from the H7N9 bird flu leaves a hospital in Bozhou, China, in April. Since early May, the number of new H7N9 cases has dramatically declined. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus. Stringer/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus

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A vendor weighs a live chicken at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last April. After closing live poultry shops in many cities around China, the rate of new H7N9 infections sharply declined. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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