A health worker collects pigeons from a trap at People's Square in Shanghai, China, earlier this month. So far, workers have tested more than 48,000 animals for the H7N9 flu virus. ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images hide caption

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ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images

With Bird Flu, 'Right Now, Anything Is Possible'

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A vendor weighs a live chicken at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong Friday. Health authorities there have stepped up the testing of live poultry from China to include a rapid test for the H7N9 bird virus. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images

People sit near pigeons at a park in Shanghai Sunday. A new strain of bird flu has spread from eastern China to other provinces, with 13 deaths reported. AP hide caption

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AP

Workers prepare an H7N9 virus detection kit at the Center for Disease Control in Beijing on April 3. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Race To Stay Ahead Of New Bird Flu Virus

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A child wears a mask near a closed section of a poultry market in Shanghai, where health workers detected the new bird flu, H7N9. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Health officials around the world are on constant lookout for the deadly bird flu. Here a worker collects chickens on a farm in Kathamndu, Nepal, where the virus was suspected of infecting poultry last October. Prakas Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakas Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Feds Set New Rules For Controversial Bird Flu Research

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Health workers in Nepal culled chickens and destroyed eggs following an outbreak of bird flu in Kathmandu in October 2012. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Put An End To Moratorium On Bird Flu Research

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Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., use eggs to see if the Asian strain of the H5N1 bird flu virus has entered the U.S. in this photo from 2006. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

Research Moratoriums And Recipes For Superbugs: Bird Flu In 2012

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A health official culls chickens on a poultry farm in a village on the outskirts of Katmandu, Nepal. Chickens suspected of being infected with H5N1 bird flu were found in the area in October. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A prefectural officer carries a chicken on a poultry farm on Oct. 15 on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, where chickens suspected of being infected with bird flu were found. Prakash Mathema /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema /AFP/Getty Images

NIH Revisits Debate On Controversial Bird Flu Research

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When a case of the potentially lethal H5N1 bird flu was found in British poultry in 2007, Dutch farmers were told to keep their poultry away from wild birds by closing off outdoor areas with wire mesh. Ed Oudenaarden/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Oudenaarden/AFP/Getty Images

A city worker sells eggs as people line up outside the truck in Mexico City on Aug. 24. The Mexican government is battling an egg shortage that has caused prices to spike in a country with the highest per-capita egg consumption on Earth. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

It's No Yolk: Mexicans Cope With Egg Shortage, Price Spikes

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci said a voluntary halt to bird flu research should stay in effect. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A government official in Bali, Indonesia, holds a chicken before administering an injection to cull it as a precautionary measure in April to prevent the spread of bird flu. Firdia Lisnawati/AP hide caption

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Firdia Lisnawati/AP