The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity

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A researcher found that online medical searches may be seen by hidden parties, and the data sold for profit. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Online Health Searches Aren't Always Confidential

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Jonathan Zittrain, co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, says the right to be forgotten online is "a very bad solution to a real problem." Samuel Lahoz/Intelligence Squared U.S. hide caption

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Debate: Should The U.S. Adopt The 'Right To Be Forgotten' Online?

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Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

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The four undergrads of the Diaspora team were given "a global commission to rebottle the genie of personal privacy" after scoring $200,000 in a Kickstarter campaign and support and mentorship from Silicon Valley's brightest. Henrik Moltke/Flickr hide caption

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A Google data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Even online privacy advocates acknowledge that keeping personal data out of the hands of third parties is virtually impossible today. Connie Zhou/AP hide caption

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If There's Privacy In The Digital Age, It Has A New Definition

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A promotional image from Renew shows one of its recycling/advertising kiosks in London. City officials asked the company to stop recording data about the phones of passing pedestrians. Renew hide caption

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David Petraeus, then-CIA director, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee in January. Petraeus resigned Friday after acknowledging an extramarital affair. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Petraeus Scandal Raises Concerns About Email Privacy

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Steve Henn, reporting on 'Morning Edition'

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