influenza influenza

Emmie de Wit, who usually works in a Biosafety Level 4 Lab, spent time in less secure labs in Liberia during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Above, she prepares to test Ebola patient blood samples. Courtesy of NIAID hide caption

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Courtesy of NIAID

Luz Barajas took her son Carlos Cholico to get his flu shot at Crawford Kids Clinic in Aurora, Colo., last year. Health officials say there is some evidence the flu shot is more protective than the nasal flu vaccine. Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images

The start of flu season is still weeks or months away, but you can get a flu shot now at many pharmacies. "It's a way to get people into the store to buy other things," says Tom Charland, an analyst who tracks the walk-in clinic industry. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Fourth-grader Jasmine Johnson got a FluMist spray at her Annapolis, Md., elementary school in 2007. This year, the nasal spray vaccine isn't recommended. Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images
Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Sick? People Say They Still Go To Work, Even When They Shouldn't

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Doctors don't always suggest that pregnant women get flu shots, which may account for the relatively low vaccination rates. Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images

Ebola virus particles (blue) emerge from a chronically infected African green monkey cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?

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Kelli Fabick of Ellisville, Mo., held her mother's Australian silky terrier, Zoey, as veterinarian Sarah Hormuth gave the dog a flu shot last April. The dog flu strain H3N2 is now circulating in more than two dozen U.S. states. St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Dog Flu Virus Spreading Across The United States

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The H1N1 swine flu virus kills some people, while others don't get very sick at all. A genetic variation offers one clue. Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Bruno Mbango Enyaka gets his flu shot at a community health center in Portland, Maine, on Jan. 7. Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images

This Year's Flu Vaccine Is Pretty Wimpy, But Can Still Help

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