The start of flu season is still weeks or months away, but you can get a flu shot now at many pharmacies. "It's a way to get people into the store to buy other things," says Tom Charland, an analyst who tracks the walk-in clinic industry. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Fourth-grader Jasmine Johnson got a FluMist spray at her Annapolis, Md., elementary school in 2007. This year, the nasal spray vaccine isn't recommended. Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Susan Biddle/Washington Post/Getty Images
Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

Sick? People Say They Still Go To Work, Even When They Shouldn't

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Doctors don't always suggest that pregnant women get flu shots, which may account for the relatively low vaccination rates. Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Tetra images RF/Getty Images

Ebola virus particles (blue) emerge from a chronically infected African green monkey cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/Flickr

'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?

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Kelli Fabick of Ellisville, Mo., held her mother's Australian silky terrier, Zoey, as veterinarian Sarah Hormuth gave the dog a flu shot last April. The dog flu strain H3N2 is now circulating in more than two dozen U.S. states. St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Dog Flu Virus Spreading Across The United States

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The H1N1 swine flu virus kills some people, while others don't get very sick at all. A genetic variation offers one clue. Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Centre For Infections/Health Pro/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Bruno Mbango Enyaka gets his flu shot at a community health center in Portland, Maine, on Jan. 7. Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Press Herald via Getty Images

This Year's Flu Vaccine Is Pretty Wimpy, But Can Still Help

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