health care fraud health care fraud

Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility. Peter Haden/WLRN hide caption

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Peter Haden/WLRN

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

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A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen /NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen /NPR

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

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Careful audits of a representative sampling of bills from 37 Medicare Advantage Programs in 2007 have revealed some consistent patterns in the way they overbill, a Center for Public Integrity investigation finds. Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Shepherd/Ikon Images/Getty Images

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has spent about $117 million on Medicare Advantage audits that have recouped just $14 million related to overcharging. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case

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Olympus, the dominant supplier of endoscopes in the U.S., agreed to pay a hefty settlement and to be supervised by an independent monitor. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pill bottles in a locked room deep inside the building that houses the Los Angeles County Health Authority Law Enforcement Task Force. Tracy Weber/ProPublica hide caption

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Tracy Weber/ProPublica

Dr. Ernest Bagner III stands outside his former office tucked in the back corner of a strip mall in Hollywood, Calif., where he says he was the victim of Medicare fraud. Jonathan Alcorn/ProPublica hide caption

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Jonathan Alcorn/ProPublica

How Fraud Flourishes Unchecked In Medicare's Drug Plan

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With help from the Affordable Care Act, government fraud investigators will make more use of computer programs to detect Medicare and Medicaid scams. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Health Law Gives Medicare Fraud Fighters New Weapons

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GlaxoSmithKline's mishandling of information on safety problems with diabetes drug Avandia is just one of the violations cited in a settlement with the government. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images