Emergency Room Emergency Room

Carmen Algeria, a survivor of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, was admitted to Sunrise Hospital. She had been shot in the leg and on Oct. 2 was awaiting surgery. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

Dr. Winston Watkins, an internist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Houston, volunteered to do a shift in the ER to give his colleagues a break. Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Osier Lindley/KERA

In A Houston Emergency Room, It Was A Week Like No Other

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547945860/548076123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore opened a six-bed urgent care center next to its infusion center a couple of years ago. Of the patients who land there, about 80 percent are discharged home afterward, rather than needing admission to the hospital. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine
Chris Nickels for NPR

Listen to Kristin Laurel read her poem

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526056664/526058158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Although expanding Medicaid in Oregon didn't drive down the recipients' overall use of hospital emergency rooms, the state has seen a decline in avoidable use of ERs by 4 percent in the past two years, according to state statistics. Paul Burns/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Burns/Getty Images

Emergency Room Use Stays High In Oregon Medicaid Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498526110/498582276" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Too often, pediatricians say, the teen depression that went undiagnosed in the community shows up in the ER as a suicide attempt. Studio 642/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Studio 642/Blend Images/Getty Images

Imodium is a popular brand of the drug loperamide. Because loperamide is increasingly being abused by opioid users, some toxicologists think it should have the same sales restrictions as pseudoephedrine. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473379238/473557160" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Hospitals Adapt ERs To Meet Patient Demand For Routine Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469809684/469972595" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Max Lebow examines the ear of 4-year-old Charlotte Anderson at Reliant Immediate Care in Los Angeles. Charlotte's mom brought her to the urgent care clinic because Charlotte was having balance problems. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Can't Get In To See Your Doctor? Many Patients Turn To Urgent Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469196691/469462424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Spotmatik/iStockphoto