Nebraska Nebraska

Mueller plans to build his chicken barns in this cornfield just south of his home. His barns would house "breeders," the hens that lay the eggs that will hatch to be raised for meat. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Farmers are lobbying for the ability to buy software to fix their equipment, and some are hacking their way around the problem. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Farmers Look For Ways To Circumvent Tractor Software Locks

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North Platte Canteen officers pose for a publicity photo, including (left to right) Helen Christ, Mayme Wyman, Jessie Hutchens, Edna Neid, and Opal Smith. Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society

The UNL NIMBUS Lab drone team hopes their technology will help ensure safer prescribed burns by keeping firefighters out of dangerous terrain. Ariana Brocious/NET News hide caption

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Ariana Brocious/NET News

Drones That Launch Flaming Balls Are Being Tested To Help Fight Wildfires

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Karen (left) and Katie — still young girls at the time this photo was taken — sit with their father, Vern, on the family's tractor. Courtesy of Katie Jantzen hide caption

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Courtesy of Katie Jantzen

Facing A Shaky Future, Nebraska Family Farm Ponders A Renaissance

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Sabas Sanchez Jr. was better known among his neighbors in Madison, Neb., as "Gordo" — Spanish for chubby. He also had an oversized personality. His father keeps this tattered photo in his wallet. Bobby Caina Calvan/Heartland Reporting Project hide caption

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Bobby Caina Calvan/Heartland Reporting Project

In America's Heartland, Heroin Crisis Is Hitting Too Close To Home

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Lincoln, Neb., is home to several startups, which use the city's low cost of living and high quality of life to attract workers. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

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Nicolas Henderson/Flickr

Silicon Prairie: Tech Startups Find A Welcoming Home In The Midwest

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Deuel County Sheriff Adam Hayward shows off a container of confiscated marijuana in Chappell, Neb., in July. Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Nebraska Says Colorado Pot Isn't Staying Across The Border

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