The tiny town of Sundsvall, Sweden, is home to the world's first airport to land passenger planes by remote control. The cameras used to help the air traffic controllers guide airplanes render details as small as cars pulling into the parking lot from miles away. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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NORAD identified the plane that crashed off the coast of Jamaica, after flying for several hours with an unresponsive pilot at the helm, as a Socata TBM-700, similar to this one. Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Malaysia Airlines had been struggling even before two of its flights were lost this year. Analysts say the national carrier faces either bankruptcy or privatization. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A German IT consultant's proof-of-concept software raises questions about efforts to secure global flight systems. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The Solar Impulse, a solar-powered plane, flies over Switzerland. The makers will be journeying across the U.S. this spring, hoping the flight helps challenge assumptions about what solar technology can do. Courtesy of Solar Impulse hide caption

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The interior of a United Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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The current radar-based air traffic control system (shown here) will eventually be replaced with a new system called NextGen, which will rely on GPS. A number of computer security experts are concerned that NextGen is insecure and vulnerable to hackers. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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The Air Force's U-2 spy plane first took flight in August 1955 and has been in commission ever since. USAF/Getty Images hide caption

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Evelyn "Mama Bird" Johnson poses by at the airport she managed in Morristown, Tenn., in this 2005 file photo. Johnson, who began flying in 1944, died Thursday. Wade Payne/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Wade Payne/AP