Signs warn not to drink the lead-contaminated water from a water fountain in Flint, Mich. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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America's 'Lead Wars' Go Beyond Flint, Mich.: 'It's Now Really Everywhere'
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Ashara Manns says she has to plan her meals around how much bottled water she has. Rebecca Kruth for NPR hide caption

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Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure
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A Flint resident cries out during the filing of a class action lawsuit against city and state government officials on Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. JAKE MAY/MLIVE.COM /Landov hide caption

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A production facility that created lead paint and other lead products once stood at Almond and Cumberland Streets, across Aramingo Avenue in Philadelphia. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Calls Continue For EPA To Clean Up Former Lead Production Site In Philly
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Residents of Flint, Mich. (shown here in January), have been protesting the quality and cost of the city's tap water for more than a year. Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

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High Lead Levels In Michigan Kids After City Switches Water Source
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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough
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Gado Labbo holds her 5-year-old son, Yusuf, at a clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. In 2010, when Yusuf first entered the clinic, he had a blood lead level 30 times higher than the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers dangerous. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A child wearing the traditional eyeliner kajal peeps from behind a door in Allahabad, India. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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A boy works at an illegal gold mine in northern Nigeria. Lead from these mines has sickened thousands of children in the region. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Old paint is the chief source of lead poisoning in children. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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