It's not the real deal. This Ebola Treatment Unit was set up for a TED talk in Vancouver so people could get a sense of what the units are like, and what it's like to put on the protective suit. Nina Gregory hide caption

itoggle caption Nina Gregory

Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Health workers are disinfected with a chlorine solution after treating patients at the Hastings Ebola Treatment Center in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Nine American aid workers have contracted Ebola while working in West Africa. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Tarkpor Mambia in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. He says he "literally froze" during his first American winter in 2013, but is getting used to the cold weather. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ryan Kellman/NPR

Nina Pham, 26, who became the first person to contract Ebola within the United States, tells the Dallas Morning News that she worries about continued health issues and will sue the hospital where she contracted Ebola. Uncredited/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Uncredited/AP

How do siblings get around the "no touching" rule during the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone? Alex and Jen Tran grabbed a rare hug when they were geared up for training. Courtesy of Alex Tran hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Alex Tran

The rapid Ebola test from Corgenix Medical Corporation is small and easy to use. But because it involves blood, health workers would still need to run the test at a lab to stay safe. Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp. hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Corgenix Medical Corp.

Mamuedeh Kanneh was married to Laiye Barwor, the man who brought Ebola to Barkedu, Liberia. He died of the virus. She now cares for her children as well as children who lost their parents to the disease. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

During an October visit to Liberia, USAID head Rajiv Shah held a joint press conference with the country's president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

A health worker with Doctors Without Borders carries a child suspected of having Ebola at the treatment center in Paynesville, Liberia, last October. Ebola is especially deadly for young children and babies. About 4 in 5 infected died. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images