Dr. Kent Brantly speaks about the world's response to Ebola during the Overseas Security Advisory Council's Annual Briefing in Washington, D.C. last month. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talks with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit in August to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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The Liberia-Guinea border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak. The Liberian city of Ganta — about a mile from the border — has historically been a hub of commerce, and was hit hard by the closure. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A boy lies on a mattress on the floor of Redemption Hospital, a holding center for Ebola patients in Monrovia, Liberia. Michel du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ebola survivor Klubo Mulbah (center), a physician assistant who was infected by a patient, celebrates among friends and family on Sept. 24 in Monrovia, Liberia. She was among 15 Liberian patients who recovered from Ebola and were released from the ELWA 2 ebola treatment center. Michel du Cille/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Daily Talk uses chalk, photos and Liberian slang to spread the latest news. Editor Alfred Sirleaf set up the blackboard on Monrovia's main thoroughfare. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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The bright yellow steel truss bridge over St. John's River is the official border crossing between Liberia and Guinea. The Liberian-Guinean border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Community workers build an Ebola clinic on Nov. 8 in Lokomasama, near Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The community decided to organize and fight the disease — building a holding center for suspected cases, enforcing a travel ban. It created a $100 fine for a handshake and a $200 fine plus six months in jail for an illegal burial. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A health worker, wearing a personal protective equipment, returns to her ambulance on November 11, 2014 after tranporting a patient to the Hastings treatment center in Hastings, outside Freetown, the only run exclusively by locals. Francisco Leong /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the community in New Georgia Signboard greet President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf Monday for the launch of the Ebola Must Go! campaign. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mrs. Mama Quaye has run Mrs. Quayes African Food Center on Ashmun St. in downtown Monrovia for over 20 years. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Liberian president Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf sits for a portrait before an NPR interview at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Monrovia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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A worker puts the finishing touches on the dividers that will separate patients at the community care center in the Port Loko district of Sierra Leone. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Makutu Jabateh hugs her daughter, Mabana Konneh, 5, as the little girl returns home to her neighborhood in Jacobstown, Monrovia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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