A unidentified family member (right) of a 10-year-old boy that contracted Ebola has her temperature measured by a health worker outside an Ebola clinic on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on Nov. 20. Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have now gone 42 days without a single reported case of Ebola. Abbas Dulleh /AP hide caption

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Guinea is where the Ebola outbreak started in West Africa. In this photo from November 2014, workers from the local Red Cross prepare to bury people who died of the virus. Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Measles, the reorganization of the World Health Organization and the Zika virus could all make global health headlines in 2016. Rich Pedroncelli, Raphael Satter, Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Medical workers surround 34-day-old Noubia, the last known patient to contract Ebola in Guinea, as she was released from a Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Conakry on Nov. 28. Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Mosoka Fallah (center), an epidemiologist who investigates cases of Ebola, meets with residents of New Kru Town, a district in Monrovia, Liberia. Daniel Berehulak/The New York Times/Redux hide caption

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Nancy Writebol, a missionary who recovered from Ebola she contracted in Liberia in 2014, told a reporter last July that she was still experiencing knee pain and hadn't fully regained her energy. Chris Keane/Getty Images hide caption

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The winner of Liberia's Integrity Idol 2015 is registered nurse Jugbeh Tarpleh Kekula. She works in the emergency room at the Liberia Government Hospital in Buchanan, the country's third-largest city with a population of some 35,000. Carielle Doe for NPR hide caption

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The photographer brings a surreal touch to the epidemic that struck West Africa in photos titled "Le Temps Ebola." The suits worn by the people portraying health professionals evoke carnival masks and animal masks. The question the photographer ponders: "Are these figures here to protect the people or to harm them?," reflecting mistrust of medical workers in the early stages of the outbreak. Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou hide caption

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Some health workers in Liberia had stopped using the protective gear that was part of the Ebola routine. The photo above is from 2014, when the epidemic was at its peak. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The WHO says transmission of Ebola has stopped in Sierra Leone. In August, Adama Sankoh, center, who contracted the virus after her son died from the disease, was cheered after being discharged from a treatment center near Freetown. Alie Turay/AP hide caption

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Nurse Kaci Hickox speaks to the media last year outside her home in Fort Kent, Maine. Hickox, who sharply protested being quarantined at a New Jersey hospital in 2014 after she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa, has filed a lawsuit against the state of New Jersey. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Dr. Ian Crozier survived Ebola, only to have his normally blue left eye turn green because of inflammation. Though the rest of his body was Ebola-free, his eye was teeming with the virus. Emory Eye Center hide caption

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Pauline Cafferkey is now in isolation at the Royal Free Hospital in North London, where she was treated in January for Ebola. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When Dr. Boie Jalloh got the call to join the fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone, his friends told him he'd be crazy to sign on. It's a good thing he didn't listen. Aurelie Marrier Dunienville for NPR hide caption

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None of the biocontainment treatment centers in U.S. hospitals were specifically designed for kids — until now. Texas Children's Hospital aims to fill that gap. Courtesy of Texas Children's Hospital hide caption

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