Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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Ryoji Noyori, a Nobel Prize-winning chemist and president of Japan's prestigious RIKEN research institute, bows at a news conference in Tokyo Tuesday to apologize for the scientific misconduct of a RIKEN colleague. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP