Bill McKelvey created Grow Well Missouri with a five-year grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to help create more access to produce — and the health benefits that come with growing it yourself. Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Erica Johnson prays before her meal. She volunteers at the food pantry at John Still school where three of her four children are students. She eats alone after she feeds her kids. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Beyond Free Lunch: Schools Open Food Pantries For Hungry Families

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People shop in a Miami grocery store on July 8. USDA says that despite the drop in unemployment, the number of food insecure Americans has not declined because higher food prices and inflation last year offset the benefits of a brighter job market. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tractors sit on a sugarcane plantation on the land of a Guarani-Kaiowá indigenous community in Brazil, where Oxfam has alleged "land grabs" unfairly take land from the poor. The United Nations is drafting voluntary guidelines for "responsible investment in agriculture and food systems" in response to such concerns. Tatiana Cardeal/Courtesy of Oxfam hide caption

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Tatiana Cardeal/Courtesy of Oxfam

Throwing out a pound of boneless beef effectively wastes 24 times more calories than throwing out a pound of vegetables or grains. Egg and dairy products fall somewhere between the two extremes. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Morgan Walker/NPR

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

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Villages in the Lower Shire valley of Malawi, like this one named Jasi, rely heavily on subsistence farming and steady rainfall, and are struggling to produce steady harvests. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Malawian Farmers Say Adapt To Climate Change Or Die

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The Brazilian agricultural sector exported for a value of $94,590 million in 2011. One of its largest exports is soybeans, like these in Cascavel, Parana. Werner Rudhart/DPA /Landov hide caption

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Werner Rudhart/DPA /Landov

More People Have More To Eat, But It's Not All Good News

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Cropland Capture's developers hope players will find where crops are grown amid Earth's natural vegetation in satellite images to shine a light on where humanity grows its food. Courtesy of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis hide caption

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Courtesy of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

The recent cuts in federal food benefits may be felt most in rural areas and the grocery stores that serve them. USDA hide caption

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USDA

Food Stamp Cuts Leave Rural Areas, And Their Grocers, Reeling

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Warren Buffett (left), Howard G. Buffett (center) and grandson Howard W. Buffett collaborated on a book about the challenges of feeding more than 2 billion more mouths by 2050. Scott Eells/Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eells/Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

MBA students from McGill University in Montreal are building a company to mass produce grasshoppers, seen here at a market in Oaxaca, Mexico. William Neuheisel/Flickr hide caption

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William Neuheisel/Flickr

A cornfield is shrouded in mist at sunrise in rural Springfield, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

American Farmers Say They Feed The World, But Do They?

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A child eats instant noodles on a train at the Harbin Railway Station in northeast China. Wang Jianwei/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Wang Jianwei/Xinhua /Landov

Food bank client Jamie Senik takes a break near her garden plot sponsored by the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona. She grows food for herself and her diabetic mother. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Tucson Food Bank Helps The Needy Grow Their Own Food

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