A deep-sea anglerfish within the pillow basalts in the Mariana Trench area. You can see its round lure between its two eyes. This fish is an ambush predator that waits for prey to be attracted by the lure before rapidly capturing them in one gulp with its large mouth. Courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas
Schmidt Ocean Institute/HADES/YouTube

Unexpected Life Found In The Ocean's Deepest Trench

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These amphipods were discovered by scientists from the University of Aberdeen in waters more than 4 miles deep, north of New Zealand. Similar shrimplike crawlers may lurk at the bottom of the Challenger Deep. Oceanlab/University of Aberdeen/AP hide caption

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7 Miles Beneath The Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?

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James Cameron traveled to the bottom of the Mariana Trench last year — a depth of nearly seven miles. Courtesy of Mark Thiessen/National Geographic hide caption

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Descending Into The Mariana Trench: James Cameron's Odyssey

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