militias militias

Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer went undercover with the Three Percent United Patriots border militia group. Winni Wintermeyer/Courtesy of Mother Jones hide caption

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Winni Wintermeyer/Courtesy of Mother Jones

What A Reporter Learned When He Infiltrated An Arizona Militia Group

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Protesters in Burns, Ore., march toward the home of Dwight Hammond Jr., a local rancher convicted of arson on federal land. The Jan. 2 protest was peaceful, but ended with a group of militiamen occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Amelia Templeton/OPB hide caption

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Amelia Templeton/OPB

Ranchers And The Federal Government: The Long History Of Conflict

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Zachary Gallegos, 23, stands guard outside the Armed Services Recruiting Center on Thursday in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The Pentagon has asked such self-appointed "armed citizens" to leave, citing security concerns. Kevin Burbach/AP hide caption

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Kevin Burbach/AP

Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard. Alan Ortega /KQED hide caption

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Alan Ortega /KQED

Migrant Heads Home To Mexico — And Joins Fight Against Cartel

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