Steve Julian, a radio host with KPCC in Los Angeles, was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer last November. He and his wife, Felicia Friesema, turned to social media for solace, support and the space to process their heartbreaking journey. Rachael Myrow/KQED hide caption

toggle caption Rachael Myrow/KQED

Valeant Pharmaceuticals has been the focus of a congressional investigation into high drug prices. . Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, while speaking to the media in September after the passage of California's End Of Life Option Act. Maynard was an advocate for the law. Carl Costas/AP hide caption

toggle caption Carl Costas/AP

Van Zyl and Garcia Flores hold hands as van Zyl promises to do everything she can to ease his pain and control symptoms. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

A Palliative Care Doctor Weighs California's New Aid-In-Dying Law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461878689/461878690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Omar looks through Kai's photo book. The charges for the infant's six months of care in the neonatal intensive care unit totaled about $11 million, according to the family, though their insurer very likely negotiated a lower rate. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

toggle caption Heidi de Marco/KHN

An Ill Newborn, A Loving Family And A Litany Of Wrenching Choices

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455677565/455936719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jo Ann Farwell, a retired social worker, has a brain tumor; she wanted to make sure her sons were clear about her end-of-life wishes. So, after talking with her doctor, she filled out a form that Oregon provides to ease those family conversations. Alan Sylvestre/Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption Alan Sylvestre/Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Medicare Says Doctors Should Get Paid To Discuss End-Of-Life Issues

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/427041879/432683736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Christy O'Donnell, who has advanced lung cancer, is one of several California patients suing for the right to get a doctor's help with prescription medicine to end their own lives if and when they feel that's necessary. YouTube hide caption

toggle caption YouTube

For best quality of life, many cancer patients who can't be cured might do best to forgo chemo and focus instead on pain relief and easing sleep and mood problems, a survey of caregivers suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

What If Chemo Doesn't Help You Live Longer Or Better?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/425654509/425654510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the movie The Fault in Our Stars, having terminal cancer doesn't look so bad for Hazel, played by Shailene Woodley, and Gus, played by Ansel Elgort. James Bridges/Temple Hill Entertainment/Kobal Collection hide caption

toggle caption James Bridges/Temple Hill Entertainment/Kobal Collection

A photo of Brittany Maynard, who moved to Oregon to end her life as she was dying of brain cancer, sits on the dais of the California Senate's health committee in March. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Nora Zamichow says if she and her husband, Mark Saylor, had known how doctors die, they might have made different treatment decisions for him toward the end of his life. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

toggle caption Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Knowing How Doctors Die Can Change End-Of-Life Discussions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413691959/420595076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When J.D. Falk was dying of stomach cancer in 2011, his wife says doctors would only talk about death in euphemisms. Hope Arnold hide caption

toggle caption Hope Arnold

Coded Talk About Assisted Suicide Can Leave Families Confused

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/408455816/408549728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Of I Wish You the Sunshine of Tomorrow, Rodgers says: "The ICU room my dad was in on the day he died had yellow walls. Every time we visited him we had to wear hospital gowns that were a bright yellow. [It] was a recurring color in that whole time frame of my life." Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers

The Rev. Vernon Holmes leads a Lutheran congregation near Sacramento, Calif., that supports the state's right-to-die bill. He describes his faith as promoting quality of life. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

California Faith Groups Divided Over Right-To-Die Bill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/397257185/397325320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript