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Doctor Considers The Pitfalls Of Extending Life And Prolonging Death

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Annette Schiller of Palm Desert, Calif., who was 94 and diagnosed with terminal thyroid and breast cancer, had trouble finding doctors to help her end her life under California's new aid-in-dying law. Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald hide caption

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Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald

Adox and Michaeli with their son, Orion, in the winter of 2015. Courtesy of Christine Gatti hide caption

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Courtesy of Christine Gatti

A Dying Man's Wish To Donate His Organs Gets Complicated

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The Rev. Josephine Falls handed out stickers to voters while accepting ballots inside the Denver Elections Division offices on Tuesday. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

"It's easier to sort of face the hard things in your life when you're not alone," says hospice chaplain Kerry Egan. "That's a big part of what a chaplain does, is she stays with you." Ann Summa/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Summa/Getty Images

Hospice Chaplain Reflects On Life, Death And The 'Strength Of The Human Soul'

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Lonny Shavelson has studied America's experiments with aid in dying. He's now helping patients and doctors in California come to grips with the state's new law. Courtesy of PhotoWords.com hide caption

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Courtesy of PhotoWords.com

This Doctor Wants To Help California Figure Out Aid-In-Dying

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Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage

Steve Julian, a radio host with KPCC in Los Angeles, was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer last November. He and his wife, Felicia Friesema, turned to social media for solace, support and the space to process their heartbreaking journey. Rachael Myrow/KQED hide caption

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Rachael Myrow/KQED

Valeant Pharmaceuticals has been the focus of a congressional investigation into high drug prices. . Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, while speaking to the media in September after the passage of California's End Of Life Option Act. Maynard was an advocate for the law. Carl Costas/AP hide caption

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Carl Costas/AP

Van Zyl and Garcia Flores hold hands as van Zyl promises to do everything she can to ease his pain and control symptoms. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health New/Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

A Palliative Care Doctor Weighs California's New Aid-In-Dying Law

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