end of life care end of life care

The Rev. Noel Hickie was working as a hospital chaplain when he met Marcia Hilton, a bereavement counselor at a hospital in Eugene, Ore. For 25 years they often worked together on hospice teams. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

For Decades These Caregivers Helped Patients, Families Through Illness And Death

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John Minor (center) in December 2014, surrounded by his family — Jackie Minor (left), Soren Johnson, John Minor, Sherry Minor, Skyelyn Johnson and Valerie Minor Johnson — in Manhattan Beach, Calif. Kimberly Sienkiewicz/Courtesy of the Minor family hide caption

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Kimberly Sienkiewicz/Courtesy of the Minor family

Aid-In-Dying Requires More Than Just A Law, Californians Find

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Dad called these "his and hers chairs." He would sit beside Mom, his partner and wife of 34 years, as they got their weekly chemotherapy treatments. Howie Borowick had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and wife Laurel was in treatment for breast cancer for the third time. For him, it was new and unknown. For her, it was business as usual, another appointment on her calendar. Nancy Borowick hide caption

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Nancy Borowick

Our Last Year Together: What My Camera Captured As My Parents Died Of Cancer

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As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News
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Doctor Considers The Pitfalls Of Extending Life And Prolonging Death

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Annette Schiller of Palm Desert, Calif., who was 94 and diagnosed with terminal thyroid and breast cancer, had trouble finding doctors to help her end her life under California's new aid-in-dying law. Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald hide caption

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Tana Yurivilca/Courtesy of Linda Fitzgerald

Adox and Michaeli with their son, Orion, in the winter of 2015. Courtesy of Christine Gatti hide caption

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Courtesy of Christine Gatti

A Dying Man's Wish To Donate His Organs Gets Complicated

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The Rev. Josephine Falls handed out stickers to voters while accepting ballots inside the Denver Elections Division offices on Tuesday. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

"It's easier to sort of face the hard things in your life when you're not alone," says hospice chaplain Kerry Egan. "That's a big part of what a chaplain does, is she stays with you." Ann Summa/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Summa/Getty Images

Hospice Chaplain Reflects On Life, Death And The 'Strength Of The Human Soul'

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Lonny Shavelson has studied America's experiments with aid in dying. He's now helping patients and doctors in California come to grips with the state's new law. Courtesy of PhotoWords.com hide caption

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Courtesy of PhotoWords.com

This Doctor Wants To Help California Figure Out Aid-In-Dying

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Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage

Steve Julian, a radio host with KPCC in Los Angeles, was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer last November. He and his wife, Felicia Friesema, turned to social media for solace, support and the space to process their heartbreaking journey. Rachael Myrow/KQED hide caption

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Rachael Myrow/KQED