Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault. Grace Hood/KUNC hide caption

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Grace Hood/KUNC

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

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Seeds of fear? To most of us, cantaloupe and horn melon look like a healthy breakfast or snack. But the clusters of seeds can evoke anxiety, nervousness and even nausea for some trypophobes. Daniel M. N. Turner/NPR hide caption

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Daniel M. N. Turner/NPR

The seed library is a partnership between the Basalt Public Library and the Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute. Seed packets encourage gardeners to write their names and take credit for their harvested seeds. Courtesy of Dylan Johns hide caption

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Courtesy of Dylan Johns

How To Save A Public Library: Make It A Seed Bank

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D. Landreth Seed Co. President Barbara Melera with a bunch of peanuts at her Philadelphia Flower Show booth. Max Matza for NPR hide caption

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Max Matza for NPR

A Seed Company That Helped Presidents And Immigrants Garden Falters

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