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Medicaid pays the costs for about 62 percent of seniors who are living in nursing homes, some of the priciest health care available. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM hide caption

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Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Nursing homes and hospitals need to work harder to keep water systems from being contaminated with bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, the CDC says. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Vincent Galvan first went to a nursing home in 2012 after his right leg was amputated. He was evicted after complaining about his care. Mariah Woelfel/WVIK hide caption

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Mariah Woelfel/WVIK

As Nursing Homes Evict Patients, States Question Motives

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Nick Dupree arrives at the Federal Courthouse in Montgomery, Ala. on Feb. 11, 2003. His success in getting the state to continue support past age 21 enabled him to attend college and live in his own home. Jamie Martin/AP hide caption

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Jamie Martin/AP

Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'

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Laura Rees (left) and her sister Nancy Fee sit with their father, Joseph Fee, while holding a photo of his late wife, Elizabeth. Robert Durell for KHN hide caption

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Robert Durell for KHN

Rule Change Could Push Hospitals To Tell Patients About Nursing Home Quality

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A court has blocked a new rule created by the Department of Health and Human Services that would preserve the right of patients and families to sue nursing homes in court. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A new rule by an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services preserves the right of patients and families to sue nursing homes in court. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

An inspection found that at one Los Angeles nursing home an employee took video of a co-worker "passing gas" on the face of a resident and posted it on Instagram. Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group/Getty Images

The physical therapy workouts a rehabilitation facility offers can be a crucial part of healing, doctors say. But a government study finds preventable harm — including bedsores and medication errors — occurring in some of those facilities, too. Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Andersen Ross/Blend Images/Getty Images

Industrial Science Hunts For Nursing Home Fraud In New Mexico Case

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Paul Hornback was a senior engineer and analyst for the U.S. Army when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease six years ago at age 55. His wife, Sarah, had to retire 18 months ago to care for him full time. Courtesy of the Hornbeck family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Hornbeck family

Big Financial Costs Are Part Of Alzheimer's Toll On Families

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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Proponents of arbitration say the system is more efficient than going to court for both sides, but arbitration can be costly, too. And a 2009 study showed the typical awards in nursing home cases are about 35 percent lower than the plaintiff would get if the case went to court. Heinz Linke/Westend61/Corbis hide caption

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Heinz Linke/Westend61/Corbis

Suing A Nursing Home Could Get Easier Under Proposed Federal Rules

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Proposed federal rules would aim to minimize the use of antipsychotic drugs and increase training for nurses in dementia care. Jiri Hubatka/imageBroker/Corbis hide caption

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Jiri Hubatka/imageBroker/Corbis

About 1 in 3 patients with dementia who live in nursing homes are being sedated with antipsychotic drugs, the GAO says. Outside nursing homes, about 1 in 7 dementia patients are getting the risky drugs. Wladimir Bulgar/iStockphoto hide caption

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Wladimir Bulgar/iStockphoto

GAO Report Urges Fewer Antipsychotic Drugs For Dementia Patients

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An overgrowth of Clostridium difficile bacteria can inflame the colon with a life-threatening infection. Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited hide caption

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Dr. David Phillips/Getty Images/Visuals Unlimited

Donna Giron wheels through the halls of the nursing home she's lived in since May. Finding an affordable home of her own has been difficult. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

When Home And Health Are Just Out Of Reach

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Marian Grunwald (from left), Earl Elfstrom and Verna Matheson bounced a balloon back and forth with nursing assistant Rick Pavlisich on Dec. 13, 2013, at an Ecumen nursing home in Chisago City, Minn. Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul hide caption

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Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul

This Nursing Home Calms Troubling Behavior Without Risky Drugs

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NPR's analysis of government data found that harsh penalties are almost never used when nursing home residents get unnecessary drugs of any kind. Owen Franken/Corbis hide caption

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Owen Franken/Corbis

Nursing Homes Rarely Penalized For Oversedating Patients

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