The Japanese Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii has the right attributes for searching for Planet Nine. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan hide caption

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National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

Astronomers Are On A Celestial Treasure Hunt. The Prize? Planet Nine

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Carolyn Porco's design of the inscription that was etched onto the capsule of Gene's remains sent to the moon. Courtesy of Carolyn Porco hide caption

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Courtesy of Carolyn Porco

A Fitting Tribute For A Stargazing Love: A Trip To The Moon

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This illustration show's NASA's Juno mission approaching Jupiter. Juno used distant stars to chart its course across the void. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

'Star Trackers' Help Juno Find Its Way

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This computer-simulated image shows a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. The cosmic monster's powerful gravity distorts space around it like the mirror in a fun house, smearing the light from nearby stars. NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute) hide caption

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NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute)

Supermassive Black Holes May Be More Common Than Anyone Imagined

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An artist's rendering shows gas falling into a supermassive black hole, creating a quasar. Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration hide caption

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Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital; SDSS collaboration

Solving The Mystery Of The Disappearing Quasar

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A view from Earth of a slender crescent moon in close proximity to the two brightest planets in the sky, Venus and Jupiter. Justin Lane/epa/Corbis hide caption

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Justin Lane/epa/Corbis

Track Jupiter's Path Like An Ancient Babylonian

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The 200-inch Hale Telescope, a masterpiece of engineering at Caltech's Palomar Observatory, was the world's largest telescope until 1993. Scott Kardel/Palomar Observatory/Courtesy of Palomar Observatory/California Institute of Technology hide caption

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Scott Kardel/Palomar Observatory/Courtesy of Palomar Observatory/California Institute of Technology

'Playing Around With Telescopes' To Explore Secrets Of The Universe

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The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one. Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

Hubble's Other Telescope And The Day It Rocked Our World

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A giant cluster of about 3,000 stars called Westerlund 2. The cluster resides in a raucous stellar breeding ground known as Gum 29, located 20,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina. NASA, ESA, STScI/AURA hide caption

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NASA, ESA, STScI/AURA

After 25 Years, The Hubble Space Telescope Still Wows Humanity

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A visualization of the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, or CMB, as detected by ESA's Planck satellite over the entire sky. ESA and the Planck Collaboration hide caption

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ESA and the Planck Collaboration

Stars over the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Sheppard and Trujillo used the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on a telescope there to find the distant dwarf planet 2012 VP 113. Reidar Hahn/Fermilab hide caption

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Reidar Hahn/Fermilab

Hunting For Big Planets Far Beyond Pluto May Soon Be Easier

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Scientists say a brief burst of radio activity has been detected at the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. This new report resembles previous activity detected in Australia, which has scientist debating possible causes, including solar flares, blitzars, or something even more mysterious. Brian Negin/iStockphoto hide caption

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Brian Negin/iStockphoto

Close Encounters Of The Radio Kind? Mystery Bursts Baffle Astronomers

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This composite image shows new details of the aftermath of a massive star that exploded and was visible from Earth over 1,000 years ago. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA hide caption

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Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA

Dying Stars Write Their Own Swan Songs

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An image showing the distribution of massive stars in the new study. Our location within the Galaxy is circled in black. J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center. hide caption

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J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center.

An artist's impression of one of the super-Earth's surrounding the star Gliese 667 about 22 light years from Earth. ESO/L. Calçada hide caption

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ESO/L. Calçada

An artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst, a powerful jet of energy lasting from less than a second to several minutes. The most powerful events in the universe, they are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. A. Roquette/ESO hide caption

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A. Roquette/ESO

Venus on the eastern limb of the Sun captured by TRACE satellite. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Venus Transit: Who Cares?

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