This composite image shows new details of the aftermath of a massive star that exploded and was visible from Earth over 1,000 years ago. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA hide caption

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The Two-Way

Dying Stars Write Their Own Swan Songs

Astronomy professor Alicia Soderberg is turning the final moments of stars into music. In doing so, she's learning just how different the supernova explosions can be.

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An image showing the distribution of massive stars in the new study. Our location within the Galaxy is circled in black. J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center. hide caption

toggle caption J. Urquhart et al./Background image by Robert Hurt of the Spitzer Science Center.

An artist's impression of one of the super-Earth's surrounding the star Gliese 667 about 22 light years from Earth. ESO/L. Calçada hide caption

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An artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst, a powerful jet of energy lasting from less than a second to several minutes. The most powerful events in the universe, they are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. A. Roquette/ESO hide caption

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Venus on the eastern limb of the Sun captured by TRACE satellite. NASA hide caption

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Venus Transit: Who Cares?

There is far deeper and far more intimate reason why the Venus transit matters and it's all about Time.

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A composite of Lyrids over Huntsville, Ala., in 2009. This year, the meteor shower will hit its peak before dawn Sunday morning. Danielle Moser/MSFC/NASA hide caption

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