Employees work on an engine production line at a Ford factory in Dagenham, England. Many American firms based in the U.K. are concerned Brexit will adversely impact their businesses. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

How U.S. Businesses In Europe Are Already Planning For Brexit

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A steel mill in Tangshan, in China's Hebei province. U.S. Steel claims that the Chinese government dumps steel at unfair prices and uses computer hackers to steal intellectual property. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A container ship is unloaded at the Port of Los Angeles. Voters in this year's presidential election have deep feelings about trade — and often are at odds with each other about it. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

A Nation Engaged: Trade Stirs Up Sharp Debate In This Election Cycle

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A worker stokes a burning cauldron at a steel mill in Hefei, in eastern China's Anhui province in 2011. Chinese steelmakers are overproducing, hurting prices and jobs, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker says. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

The Port of Hamburg's trade volume has more than doubled since 1990 and is projected to double again by 2030. Andrew Schneider for NPR hide caption

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Andrew Schneider for NPR

Germany's Big Port Eager For U.S.-EU Trade Deal, But Some Are Skeptical

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A Boeing 737 at the company's factory in Renton, Wash. Foreign airlines that want to buy Boeing planes often do so with loans underwritten by the Export-Import Bank. Saul Loeb/AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AP

U.S. Export-Import Bank Targeted By Conservatives

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A Malaysian flag sits on a table among other flags during a news conference at the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement talks in July 2012 in San Diego. Nearly two and a half years later, the deal remains incomplete. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China. Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov

A worker stacks traffic safety poles at Pexco's manufacturing center in Fife, Wash. The small company ships products all over the world, with the help of federal insurance from the Export-Import Bank. Drew Perine/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Drew Perine/MCT/Landov

Shipping containers sit at a port in Tianjin, China, on Feb. 28. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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Alexander F. Yuan/AP

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