individual mandate individual mandate

Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander chairs the Senate's Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee; Sen. Patty Murray is the committee's ranking Democrat. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty

Steve Daines of Montana (right) talks with fellow Republican Sens. Mitch McConnell and Pat Roberts in a White House meeting in June on the GOP health care strategy, which would include deep cuts to Medicaid. Montana insurers say the plan worries them. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Montana Insurers Say Medicaid Cuts Would Drive Up Cost Of Private Health Plans

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Carl Goulden, of Littlestown Pa., developed hepatitis B 10 years ago. Soon his health insurance premiums soared beyond a price he and his wife could afford. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

U.S. Health Care Wrestles With The 'Pre-Existing Condition'

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To keep health insurance solvent, the pool of covered people needs to include the well and the sick. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

One person who got a letter canceling his health insurance was Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo. He holds up the letter during a congressional hearing Wednesday on insurance problems. He says his family chose to buy private insurance rather than use the congressional plan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Notices Canceling Health Insurance Leave Many On Edge

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Supporters and opponents of the health care law rallied in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday, as the court considered the constitutionality of the insurance mandate. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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John Rose/NPR

A bulletin board in New York's Jamaica Hospital offers advice for uninsured patients. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Uninsured Will Still Need The Money To Meet The Mandate

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4 Questions That Could Make Or Break The Health Care Law

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Sally Baptiste from Orlando, Fla., waits outside the U.S. Capitol for the vote on the health care bill on March 21, 2010. Astrid Riecken/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

How The Health Law Could Survive Without A Mandate

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