Supporters and opponents of the health care law rallied in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday, as the court considered the constitutionality of the insurance mandate. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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John Rose/NPR

A bulletin board in New York's Jamaica Hospital offers advice for uninsured patients. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Uninsured Will Still Need The Money To Meet The Mandate

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4 Questions That Could Make Or Break The Health Care Law

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Sally Baptiste from Orlando, Fla., waits outside the U.S. Capitol for the vote on the health care bill on March 21, 2010. Astrid Riecken/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/Getty Images

How The Health Law Could Survive Without A Mandate

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