Protest banners hang in rural Seongju county, where the U.S. has installed a missile defense system known by its acronym, THAAD. Residents oppose the installation, and it's become an issue in South Korea's upcoming presidential election. The front-runner says he wants to rethink the U.S. deal. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Korean Village's Message To THAAD Missile Defense System: 'Go Away'

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In this photo provided by U.S. Forces Korea, trucks carrying U.S. missile launchers and other equipment needed to set up the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile defense system arrive at the Osan air base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea on Monday. U.S. Force Korea via AP hide caption

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U.S. Force Korea via AP

U.S. Fast-Tracks Missile Defense System To South Korea, Drawing China's Ire

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U.S. soldiers stand beside a Patriot missile system at a Turkish military base in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey, last October. In a joint statement, Washington and Ankara said the missiles would be withdrawn for updating and modernization. Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov

A photo provided by Lockheed Martin shows a test of its THAAD missile interceptor system. The Pentagon has awarded a contract worth more than $3.9 billion for the system. Lockheed Martin hide caption

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Lockheed Martin