At NPR's Sound Bites Cafe, all food gets coded with one of three circles: Green is reserved for the most healthful dishes; yellow flags the "good choices;" and red signals the high-calorie foods to grab "on occasion." NPR hide caption

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Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Morgan Barnett, 7, drinks from containers of 1 percent milk and chocolate milk during lunch at a school in St. Paul, Minn., in 2006. Eric Miller/AP hide caption

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There might be much more caffeine than you think in those supplements you're taking. There also might be much less. Janine Lamontagne/iStockphoto hide caption

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While lots of labels tout their lack of genetically modified ingredients, if California's Prop. 37 succeeds, foods containing GMOs would have to be labeled. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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If you look very closely, you'll see "evaporated cane juice" in the ingredients list on this yogurt. A California woman is suing the Chobani yogurt company over its use of the term. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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There's no industry standard size for food and drink portions, so it's hard to compare a Big Gulp with a McDonald's medium soda. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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The Salt

How Food And Clothing Size Labels Affect What We Eat And What We Wear

Food and clothing labeled small appeal to us, even when the labels lie, a marketing professor says.

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New York Winemaker Christopher Tracy and a bottle of his Blaufrankisch. The wine's difficult to pronounce name may attract oenophiles. Charles Lane/NPR hide caption

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Beef cuts that are used to make "pink slime" or lean finely textured beef were on display during a tour in March of the Beef Products Inc.'s plant in South Sioux City, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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People march demanding labels for genetically modified food near the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 16, 2011. Ren Haijun/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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