Coming soon: The redesigned nutrition facts label will highlight added sugars in food. The label also will display calories per serving, and serving size, more prominently. U.S. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

toggle caption U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The maker of Kind bars — which contain almonds and other nuts — pushed back against an FDA complaint about its use of the phrase "healthy and tasty." The FDA is now reviewing its definition of "healthy" as used on food labels. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why The FDA Is Re-Evaluating The Nutty Definition Of 'Healthy' Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477514200/477693559" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary Lou Wesselhoeft is a dairy farmer in the Florida Panhandle. Her Ocheesee Creamery pasteurized skim milk has nothing added — and that's the problem. According to regulations, without added vitamins, it can only be sold as "imitation skim milk." Courtesy of Institute for Justice hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Institute for Justice

A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

toggle caption California Center for Public Health Advocacy

A new logo that is supposed to ensure a Paris restaurant's food is homemade (fait maison in French) is already stirring up controversy. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

A woman shops at a supermarket in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

At NPR's Sound Bites Cafe, all food gets coded with one of three circles: Green is reserved for the most healthful dishes; yellow flags the "good choices;" and red signals the high-calorie foods to grab "on occasion." NPR hide caption

toggle caption NPR
Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/245225365/245257907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Morgan Barnett, 7, drinks from containers of 1 percent milk and chocolate milk during lunch at a school in St. Paul, Minn., in 2006. Eric Miller/AP hide caption

toggle caption Eric Miller/AP

There might be much more caffeine than you think in those supplements you're taking. There also might be much less. Janine Lamontagne/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption Janine Lamontagne/iStockphoto

While lots of labels tout their lack of genetically modified ingredients, if California's Prop. 37 succeeds, foods containing GMOs would have to be labeled. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

toggle caption Paul Sakuma/AP