Dr. Dilan Ellegala, left, supervises Dr. Emmanuel Nuwas of Tanzania as he inserts a shunt in a baby with hydrocephalus. Ellegala has played a key role in training local doctors, as described in the new book A Surgeon in the Village. Early on, he trained a hospital staffer who wasn't a doctor to do brain surgery. Tony Bartelme hide caption

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Tony Bartelme

A gay man with HIV stands in a clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He's been afraid to pick up his medicine because of the government's crackdown on the gay community. Kevin Sief/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Sief/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Tanzanian President John Magufuli canceled Independence Day celebrations and ordered a national day of cleanup instead. He picked up trash outside the State House during the Dec. 9 event. Daniel Hayduk /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Hayduk /AFP/Getty Images

This Politician's Philosophy: No Perks For You

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Becoming a father made Dr. Namala Mkopi appreciate why parents worry so much. He's been a leading advocate for childhood vaccines in his native Tanzania. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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A Maasai boy and his dog, near the skeleton of an elephant killed by poachers outside of Arusha, Tanzania, in 2013. Jason Straziuso/AP hide caption

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Jason Straziuso/AP

DNA Tracking Of Ivory Helps Biologists Find Poaching Hotspots

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Tanzanians from far-flung villages were brought to a fancy hotel to discuss natural gas policy. Courtesy of the Center for Global Development hide caption

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Courtesy of the Center for Global Development

It's Not A Come-On From A Cult. It's A New Kind Of Poll!

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Children with albinism, a genetic condition that can cause vision problems, study at a school for the blind in Tanzania. Because albinos are often attacked, the school is a rare sanctuary. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images