President Trump gives a thumbs up as he speaks on the phone in the Oval Office on Jan. 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Trump Tweeting From a 'Secure' Smartphone? The White House Won't Say

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Cybersecurity presents an early challenge for the incoming president, Donald Trump. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Experts Hope Trump Makes Cybersecurity An Early Priority

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The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

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ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

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Despite cybersecurity and hacks being a constant issue during the campaign, neither Donald Trump, nor Hillary Clinton professes to have expertise in this policy area. Mark Ralston/AP hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AP

Cyber Aggression Takes A Back Seat To Other Presidential Campaign Issues

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Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the DNC is working to secure its network as quickly as possible. She's shown here in 2014. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian Hackers Penetrate Democratic National Committee, Steal Trump Research

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Beth Cobert says cybersecurity has been boosted since she took over as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management last summer. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

One Year After OPM Data Breach, What Has The Government Learned?

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The official FBI seal is seen on an iPhone camera screen outside the agency's headquarters. With help from a third party, the FBI managed to unlock the iPhone used by one of San Bernardino shooters. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Next Apple-FBI Question: Who Can Know How The iPhone Was Hacked?

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The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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John Morgan/Flickr

At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity

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The Echo, a digital assistant that can be set up in a home or office, vaulted into the top 10 of Amazon's best-selling electronics this year. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

How Did We Do On 2015 Tech Predictions? 'Still Waiting'

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) speaks at a year-end news conference, on Capitol Hill, Friday, Dec. 18. The Senate passed the $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill that funds the government, by a vote of 65-33. Michael Reynolds/EPA/Landov hide caption

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President Obama speaks at the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection at Stanford University on Feb. 13. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama, seen at a cybersecurity summit in Palo Alto, Calif., in February. The White House has called the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act an "important building block." Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov

Senate Approves Cybersecurity Bill: What You Need To Know

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Mark Patterson, owner of PATCO Construction in Sanford, Maine, boosted his security and bought cybercrime insurance after his company lost more than $500,000 to cyberfraud. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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As Cybercrime Proliferates, So Does Demand For Insurance Against It

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Eugene Kaspersky, founder and chief executive officer of Kaspersky Lab, at his office in Moscow last Dec. 9. Kaspersky and his firm have ties to the Russian government, but say that should not be cause for concern in the West, where the company's cybersecurity software is widely used. Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr./Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr./Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kaspersky Lab: Based In Russia, Doing Cybersecurity In The West

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The Commerce Department is looking to place tighter controls on exporting software that can attack a network. The cybersecurity industry opposes the proposed new rules. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Commerce Department: Tighter Controls Needed For Cyberweapons

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Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In Data Breach, Reluctance To Point The Finger At China

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A surprising number of Social Security numbers have been stolen, and that number keeps rising. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Theft Of Social Security Numbers Is Broader Than You Might Think

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