Gloria, 13, of Oaxaca, Mexico, holds a duck at home. Sexually abused by her father, she became a mother at the age of 12. Christian Rodrí­guez/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016 hide caption

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Christian Rodrí­guez/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

How Luck And Intuition Helped To Build Instagram

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The Benicia Compliments page sprang up on Instagram as a platform for girls attending Benicia High School to tag each other in positive social media posts. Shawn Wen/Youth Radio hide caption

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Shawn Wen/Youth Radio

Teen Girls Flip The Negative Script On Social Media

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Comedian and actress Grace Helbig is a star on YouTube. "Having an audience that listens to and resonates with your creative ideas is invaluable," she says. Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP hide caption

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Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP

How Do You Measure Passion? Figuring The Value Of Social Media Followers

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"Oh, look! There's a donkey in my living room!!!" was the photographer's Instagram caption. Adriana Zehbrauskas/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2015 hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2015

Donald Trump and Jeb Bush were polite to each other at the first GOP debate. But it's been gloves off since then, especially on Instagram, a social media outlet not known for its vitriol. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Instagram: The New Political War Room?

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Ugaaso Boocow is back — and instagramming — in her homeland of Somalia. Courtesy of Ugaaso A. Boocow hide caption

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Courtesy of Ugaaso A. Boocow

Her Instagram Feed Finds The Fun In Long-Suffering Somalia

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Stefano Gabbana (left) and Domenico Dolce, seen here during the recent Milan Fashion Week, are being criticized for remarks about same-sex families, sparking a boycott led by musician Elton John. Daniel Dal Zennaro/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Dal Zennaro/EPA/Landov

Instagram was the target of a storm of outrage on Twitter and other sites after the company announced a change in its user agreement that hinted that it might use shared photos in ads. Karly Domb Sadof/AP hide caption

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Karly Domb Sadof/AP

The Day Instagram Almost Lost Its Innocence

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