Sam Swiller and his dog, Sully, in their home in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Deaf Jam: Experiencing Music Through A Cochlear Implant
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For more than 30 years, Marion Downs pushed for newborns to be screened for hearing loss soon after birth. Marion Downs Center hide caption

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Remembering The Pioneering Audiologist Who Tested Hearing At Birth
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Kathleen Raven, a health reporter, found out she had hearing loss when she was 5 years old. Jessica Horwitz hide caption

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Hearing Aid Evolution Unveils What The World Sounds Like In '3-D'
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Seeing Less Helps The Brain Hear More
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The current record holder for loudest crowd in history are the fans of the Seattle Seahawks, who cheered so loud that they induced a mini-earthquake. But that level of noise can permanently damage fans' hearing. Scott Eklund/AP hide caption

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Basic hearing aids cost an average of $1,500 per ear. IStockphoto.com hide caption

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Hearing Aids: A Luxury Good For Many Seniors
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Musician Jake Orrall performs onstage at the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival on April 14. Temporary hearing loss following concerts and other loud events may protect our ears from more permanent damage. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Coachella hide caption

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Composer Richard Einhorn lost most of his hearing several years ago, but that hasn't held him back, thanks to state-of-the-art digital hearing aids. Kevin Rivoli/AP hide caption

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Listen Up To Smarter, Smaller Hearing Aids
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If you know some mice that took This Is Spinal Tap too literally, they might want to know about an experiment to restore hearing with a failed Alzheimer's drug. The Kobal Collection hide caption

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Alzheimer's Drug Dials Back Deafness In Mice
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Traditional Medicare doesn't pay for hearing aids, so some in Congress would like to give purchasers a tax break. Marek Brzezinski/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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