Doctors who diagnosed Shariah Vroman-Nagy with bipolar disorder wanted to keep her in the hospital for treatment, but her insurance company wouldn't cover the stay. Andreas Fuhrmann for KQED hide caption

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Depressed Teen's Struggle To Find Mental Health Care In Rural California

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Suicide rates for women and girls are on the rise. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Suicide Rates Climb In U.S., Especially Among Adolescent Girls

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Carolyn Walworth is a junior at Palo Alto High School (the main building of which is shown here in 2012). After four recent suicides in her school district, she wrote an op-ed about the stress faced by students in the area, which is home to some of the nation's most competitive public high schools. Ho John Lee/Flickr hide caption

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In Palo Alto's High-Pressure Schools, Suicides Lead To Soul-Searching

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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama unveiled the Let Girls Learn program at the East Room of the White House on Tuesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The ParaGuard IUD, which releases copper into the uterine cavity, can last up to 10 years. In clinical studies, the pregnancy rate among women using the device was less than 1 pregnancy per 100 women annually. Mark Harmel/Science Source hide caption

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Research into how the human brain develops helps explain why teens have trouble controlling impulses. Leigh Wells/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

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Researchers say that aggressive people tend to interpret ambiguous faces as reflecting hostility. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Would Angry Teens Chill Out If They Saw More Happy Faces?

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Members of the boys basketball team from Dimond High School in Anchorage, Alaska, celebrate their 2012 state championship victory. Psychological research shows that sports camaraderie improves teenagers' mental health. Charles Pulliam/AP hide caption

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Why Exercise May Do A Teenage Mind Good

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