Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Ed Perlmutter shakes hands with Carlyn Meyer and other members of the groups J-Street and MoveOn.org as they urge him to support the Iran nuclear deal at an event in Denver. J-Street plans to spend about $5 million on ads in this fight, which is vastly dwarfed by the $20 million to $40 million from groups like AIPAC that oppose the agreement. Jason Bahr/Getty Images hide caption

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Lobbyists Spending Millions To Sway The Undecided On Iran Deal
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The amount of money spent on Capitol Hill is way more than small change — but the impact of that money is a little murky. Here, the U.S. Capitol is reflected in a fountain full of coins on Election Day this year. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Spenders On Capitol Hill Pay Billions, Receive Trillions
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When Lobbyists Pay To Meet With Congressmen
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Why Lobbyists Dodge Calls From Congressmen
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A Former Lobbyist Tells All
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Jack Abramoff in 2004. He's the one on the right. Dennis Cook/AP hide caption

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Jack Abramoff On Lobbying
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