Pregnant women infected by the Zika virus are concerned about the possible link to a birth defect. Above: Angelica Prato of Colombia has a checkup. Schneyder Mendoza /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is It Realistic To Recommend Delaying Pregnancy During Zika Outbreak?

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U.S. health officials are telling pregnant women to avoid travel to Latin America and Caribbean countries with outbreaks of Zika, a tropical illness linked to birth defects. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (from left), Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Chinese President Xi Jinping and South African President Jacob Zuma pose for a photo during the BRICS Summit in Ufa, Russia, in July. RIA Novosti via AP hide caption

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Highflying 'Emerging Markets' Had Their Wings Clipped In 2015

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Cuba's President Raul Castro (center) encourages Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and the commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, known as Timochenko, to shake hands, in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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All the talk about immigration in the U.S. presidential campaign has renewed focus on the linguistic question of how to refer to people from Latin America. Here, the flags of Latin American and Caribbean states fly at a regional summit in San Jose, Costa Rica, in January. Arnoldo Robert/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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The headquarters of the South American Football Confederation, or CONMEBOL, in Luque, Paraguay. The confederation has the status of an embassy, which includes legal immunity in Paraguay. Two former heads of CONMEBOL have been indicted in the FIFA scandal, accused of taking bribes and money laundering. Norberto Duarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FIFA's Soccer 'Embassy' In Paraguay, Complete With Legal Immunity

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President Obama, seen shaking hands with Raul Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama, engaged in the first substantive face-to-face U.S.-Cuba talks in more than 50 years. Scott Horsley/NPR hide caption

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A platform owned by Mexico's state-run oil company Pemex is seen off the Bay of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico. The country has recently opened up its energy sector to foreign investors. Victor Ruiz/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Excitement Over Mexico's Shale Fizzles As Reality Sets In

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Embattled Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (shown here at the 21st International Construction Salon in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Tuesday) was elected four months ago. Her administration has been hit hard by economic problems and a massive corruption scandal at the state oil company, Petrobras. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Drumbeat Grows Louder For Impeachment Of Brazil's Rousseff

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The alleged leader of the Zetas drug cartel, Omar Trevino Morales, is taken under custody to be presented to the press at the Attorney General Office's hangar at the airport in Mexico City, on March 4. Mexican authorities captured Trevino Wednesday, dealing a blow to the feared gang and giving the embattled government a second major arrest in a week. Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mexico Takes Out Cartel Heads, But Crime Continues To Climb

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The 2,100-person Tijuana municipal police force is one of Mexico's largest. It's also the first in the country to employ body cameras for its officers. Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Tijuana Cops Turn On Body Cameras And Hope To Turn Off Bribery

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Mercedes-Benz, Ford and Volkswagen workers block the Anchieta highway in Sao Bernardo do Campo. Thousands of metalworkers marched to protest layoffs by carmakers expecting little or no rebound from a sharp 2014 downturn. Adonis Guerra/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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In Brazil, A Once-High-Flying Economy Takes A Tumble

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In 1959, Fidel Castro imposed a law forbidding the import of foreign cars, so many Cubans drive and maintain older models. Kate Skogen/JetKat Photo hide caption

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Despite Its Beauty, Cuba Isn't Quite Ready For Tourists

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Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period. Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Brazil's Tearful President Praises Report On Abuses Of A Dictatorship

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A newsstand owner counts Argentine pesos in Buenos Aires. Many Argentines carry large amounts of cash, saying they do not trust banks. This has contributed to a surge in robberies. Leo La Valle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Argentina: Where Cash Is King And Robberies Are On The Rise

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A woman waits for customers at a street market where she sells shoes in Sao Paulo. Brazil and other Latin American economies have prospered by selling commodities and low-tech goods. But now many economies are struggling, and some point to the region's lack of high-tech and other cutting-edge industries. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

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Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory. Jorge Saenz/AP hide caption

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The Place Where Rutherford B. Hayes Is A Really Big Deal

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