In 1959, Fidel Castro imposed a law forbidding the import of foreign cars, so many Cubans drive and maintain older models. Kate Skogen/JetKat Photo hide caption

itoggle caption Kate Skogen/JetKat Photo

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period. Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov

A newsstand owner counts Argentine pesos in Buenos Aires. Many Argentines carry large amounts of cash, saying they do not trust banks. This has contributed to a surge in robberies. Leo La Valle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Leo La Valle/AFP/Getty Images

A woman waits for customers at a street market where she sells shoes in Sao Paulo. Brazil and other Latin American economies have prospered by selling commodities and low-tech goods. But now many economies are struggling, and some point to the region's lack of high-tech and other cutting-edge industries. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Andre Penner/AP

Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mario Tama/Getty Images

Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory. Jorge Saenz/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jorge Saenz/AP

Passengers ride a cable car that links downtown La Paz with El Alto, Bolivia, in September. The trip costs about 40 cents and takes 10 minutes — compared with 35 cents and a half-hour by minibus. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Karita/AP

Demonstrators call for more protection for women in Colombia last spring. Only 20 percent of respondents in the country said they feel women are respected there. One protester holds a sign reading "Woman, neither submissive, nor devout. I want you free, pretty and crazy." Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Kahn/NPR

Migrants arrive at a rest stop in Ixtepec, Mexico, after a 15-hour ride atop a freight train headed north toward the U.S. border on Aug. 4. Thousands of migrants ride atop the trains, known as La Bestia, or The Beast, during their long and perilous journey through Mexico to the U.S. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Demonstrators rally to protest sexism in Brasilia, Brazil, last June. A new protest erupted last week after a study released by Brazil's Institute for Applied Economic Research reported 65 percent of Brazilians believe women who dress provocatively deserve to be attacked. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazilian slave laborers stop their work to listen to a Labor Ministry inspector explain their legal rights, on the Bom Jesus farm in the Amazon basin in 2003. Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov