Brazilian slave laborers stop their work to listen to a Labor Ministry inspector explain their legal rights, on the Bom Jesus farm in the Amazon basin in 2003. Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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The skull of a female Neanderthal, who lived about 50,000 years ago, is displayed at the Natural History Museum in London. Rick Findler/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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A man smokes marijuana outside Uruguay's parliament in Montevideo on Wednesday, where lawmakers in the lower house debated and passed a bill that would legalize marijuana and regulate its production and distribution. Matilde Campodonico/AP hide caption

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Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013. Nelson Antoine/AP hide caption

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A soldier watches over public transport users during an operation in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in April. The crime rate is soaring in Honduras, and corrupt and ineffective law enforcement is widely seen as part of the problem. Rafael Ochoa/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Images from posters made by relatives show 10 of the 12 young people kidnapped in broad daylight from a bar in Mexico City on May 26. No one has claimed responsibility for the brazen abduction. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Colombian army soldiers patrol the Loma de Cristo—bal neighborhood after warring gangs forced dozens of families to flee. Medellin used to be the most dangerous city in the world but officials embarked on innovative projects designed to make life better in tough neighborhoods. Paul Smith for NPR hide caption

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Members of the 18th Street gang announce a truce during a press conference at a prison in San Pedro Sula on May 28. Leonel Cruz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Honduras Claims Unwanted Title Of World's Murder Capital

When visiting San Pedro Sula, the bloodiest town in Honduras, it's advisable to arrive early in the morning, when the drug gangs are still asleep.

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At this prison in Barinas, Venezuela, the inmates are in charge. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

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Eloisa Barrios visits the humble graves of nine male family members in the Guanayen cemetery. She says all nine were killed by the police, in what was a vendetta against her family. Recently, a 10th member of the family was stabbed to death. He was 17. Meridith Kohut for NPR hide caption

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Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict. Paul Smith for NPR hide caption

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An artist on Rio de Janeiro's Copacabana beach puts the final touches on a sand sculpture of the kissing bug, which spreads Chagas' disease. The sculpture was part of an event in 2009 commemorating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the disease. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Presilla's Ecuadorian Spicy Onion and Tamarillo Salsa, made right in David Greene's kitchen. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Skeletons: Skeleton imagery pervades this holiday. In pre-Columbian times, the Day of the Dead was celebrated in August. It now takes place on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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Vampire bats are common in Central and South America, where they feed on livestock and sometimes people. Michael & Patricia Fogden/Corbis hide caption

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