Sarai Isaura Gonzalez stars in the music video to Bomba Estereo's "Soy Yo." Via YouTube hide caption

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In 'Soy Yo' Video, Bomba Estéreo Pays Tribute To 'What's Inside Of You'

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Countries in Latin America have a range of laws regarding abortion, from completely prohibited to no restrictions. Above: Women in Brazil (at left) demonstrate for abortion rights; a woman at a march in Paraguay (at right) holds a poster reading "If Abortion is Not Wrong, Then Nothing Is Wrong." Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images hide caption

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Duane "Dewey" Clarridge, a CIA veteran, speaks in May 2007 during an Arkansas Committee on Foreign Relations luncheon in Little Rock, Ark. The retired spy criticized the CIA's leadership and said a lack of human intelligence had led to mistakes in Iraq, Iran and North Korea. Mike Wintroath/AP hide caption

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Pregnant women infected by the Zika virus are concerned about the possible link to a birth defect. Above: Angelica Prato of Colombia has a checkup. Schneyder Mendoza /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is It Realistic To Recommend Delaying Pregnancy During Zika Outbreak?

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U.S. health officials are telling pregnant women to avoid travel to Latin America and Caribbean countries with outbreaks of Zika, a tropical illness linked to birth defects. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (from left), Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Chinese President Xi Jinping and South African President Jacob Zuma pose for a photo during the BRICS Summit in Ufa, Russia, in July. RIA Novosti via AP hide caption

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Highflying 'Emerging Markets' Had Their Wings Clipped In 2015

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Cuba's President Raul Castro (center) encourages Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and the commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, known as Timochenko, to shake hands, in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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All the talk about immigration in the U.S. presidential campaign has renewed focus on the linguistic question of how to refer to people from Latin America. Here, the flags of Latin American and Caribbean states fly at a regional summit in San Jose, Costa Rica, in January. Arnoldo Robert/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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The headquarters of the South American Football Confederation, or CONMEBOL, in Luque, Paraguay. The confederation has the status of an embassy, which includes legal immunity in Paraguay. Two former heads of CONMEBOL have been indicted in the FIFA scandal, accused of taking bribes and money laundering. Norberto Duarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FIFA's Soccer 'Embassy' In Paraguay, Complete With Legal Immunity

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President Obama, seen shaking hands with Raul Castro at the Summit of the Americas in Panama, engaged in the first substantive face-to-face U.S.-Cuba talks in more than 50 years. Scott Horsley/NPR hide caption

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A platform owned by Mexico's state-run oil company Pemex is seen off the Bay of Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico. The country has recently opened up its energy sector to foreign investors. Victor Ruiz/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Excitement Over Mexico's Shale Fizzles As Reality Sets In

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