Alice Snyder, with her parents Mary and Ryan, during a checkup with Dr. John Herzenberg, who treated her clubfoot without surgery. Jenny Gold/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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How Parents And The Internet Transformed Clubfoot Treatment

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The chemicals in home wart-freezing treatments are flammable, the Food and Drug Administration warns. Courtesy of FDA hide caption

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Janet Wertheimer does a back hyperextension exercise at Boston Sports Club in Wellesley, Mass. Regular exercise has helped control her chronic back pain. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Pain In The Back? Exercise May Help You Learn Not To Feel It

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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

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Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes severe diarrhea, can be difficult to treat with antibiotics. Stefan Hyman/University of Leicester hide caption

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University of Florida researcher Jennifer Stamps administers the peanut butter sniff test to a volunteer. Jesse S. Jones/University of Florida hide caption

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Classical mechanics, represented by Isaac Newton, typically doesn't play nicely with quantum mechanics, represented by Schrodinger's cat. But the 2013 Nobel laureates for chemistry figured out a way to get the two to work together. Courtesy of the Nobel Prize hide caption

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Particles of the hepatitis C virus are imaged with an electron microscope. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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Hepatitis C patient Nancy Turner shows Kathleen Coleman, a nurse practitioner, where a forearm rash, a side effect of her treatment, has healed. Turner is one of many patients with hepatitis C experimenting with new drugs to beat back the virus. Richard Knox/NPR hide caption

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As Hepatitis C Sneaks Up On Baby Boomers, Treatment Options Grow

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Nurse Irena Majola tests Justice Mlambo's blood for HIV at a roadside AIDS testing table in a suburb near Cape Town. Under the "test and treat" strategy, about 45 million South Africans would need to be screened for HIV each year. Rodger Bosch/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A cross-sectional X-ray shows what's called a "sunken chest." The bright circle near the bottom is the spine; the gray blob on the right is the heart. Living LLC/Getty Images hide caption

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Magnets May Pull Kids With Sunken Chests Out Of Operating Room

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