An analysis of 20 studies failed to find good evidence that standing at a work desk is better than sitting. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Lower-back pain is one of the top three reasons that Americans go to the doctor. But the solution can be a DIY project. iStockphoto hide caption

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Forget The Gizmos: Exercise Works Best For Lower-Back Pain

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Doris Keene (right) talks with her acupuncturist before a treatment at Portland's Quest Center for Integrative Health. Keene says the treatments have eased her chronic back pain at least as effectively as the Vicodin and muscle relaxants she once relied on. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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To Curb Pain Without Opioids, Oregon Looks To Alternative Treatments

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Primal posture: Ubong tribesmen in Borneo (right) display the perfect J-shaped spines. A woman in Burkina Faso (left) holds her baby so that his spine stays straight. The center image shows the S-shaped spine drawn in a modern anatomy book (Fig. I) and the J-shaped spine (Fig. II) drawn in the 1897 anatomy book Traite d'Anatomie Humaine. Courtesy of Esther Gokhale and Ian Mackenzie/Nomads of the Dawn hide caption

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Lost Posture: Why Some Indigenous Cultures May Not Have Back Pain

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A West Coast team player kicks the ball during a match at the Adidas Challenges America's Youth Soccer Stars tournament in Venice, Calif. Getty Images hide caption

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Young Athletes Risk Back Injury By Playing Too Much

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Janet Wertheimer does a back hyperextension exercise at Boston Sports Club in Wellesley, Mass. Regular exercise has helped control her chronic back pain. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Pain In The Back? Exercise May Help You Learn Not To Feel It

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