A unidentified family member (right) of a 10-year-old boy that contracted Ebola has her temperature measured by a health worker outside an Ebola clinic on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on Nov. 20. Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have now gone 42 days without a single reported case of Ebola. Abbas Dulleh /AP hide caption

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Abbas Dulleh /AP

Medical workers surround 34-day-old Noubia, the last known patient to contract Ebola in Guinea, as she was released from a Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Conakry on Nov. 28. Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cellou Binani /AFP/Getty Images

The WHO says transmission of Ebola has stopped in Sierra Leone. In August, Adama Sankoh, center, who contracted the virus after her son died from the disease, was cheered after being discharged from a treatment center near Freetown. Alie Turay/AP hide caption

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Alie Turay/AP

Nurse Kaci Hickox speaks to the media last year outside her home in Fort Kent, Maine. Hickox, who sharply protested being quarantined at a New Jersey hospital in 2014 after she returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa, has filed a lawsuit against the state of New Jersey. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

When Dr. Boie Jalloh got the call to join the fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone, his friends told him he'd be crazy to sign on. It's a good thing he didn't listen. Aurelie Marrier Dunienville for NPR hide caption

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Aurelie Marrier Dunienville for NPR

A celebration erupts in the streets of the Massessehbeh village on Friday, after President Ernest Bai Koroma officially ended Sierra Leone's largest remaining Ebola quarantine. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Nurse Issa French with his wife Anita, who's holding a copy of Time magazine's issue devoted to front-line workers. He's earned that title, treating more than 420 Ebola patients. Amy Maxmen for NPR hide caption

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Amy Maxmen for NPR

A police officer guards the home of a family under a 21-day Ebola quarantine in Freetown, Sierra Leone, back in March. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

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Michael Duff/AP

Why Ebola Won't Go Away In West Africa

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Chuckie Taylor in Liberia at an unknown date and location. Courtesy of Johnny Dwyer and Lynn Henderson hide caption

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Courtesy of Johnny Dwyer and Lynn Henderson

Florida Teen, War Criminal: The Life Of An 'American Warlord'

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The health workers of Sierra Leone — like Dr. Komba Songu M'Briwah (on the phone) — were dedicated to fighting Ebola. But they had a huge handicap. A government report reveals that some of the money allocated went to pay "ghost workers." David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Light shines through the chlorine-stained windows in the blood-testing area at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, Monrovia, Liberia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

As Ebola Crisis Ebbs, Aid Agencies Turn To Building Up Health Systems

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How do siblings get around the "no touching" rule during the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone? Alex and Jen Tran grabbed a rare hug when they were geared up for training. Courtesy of Alex Tran hide caption

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Courtesy of Alex Tran

The Brother Went To Fight Ebola. So Did His Sister. Mom Was 'A Wreck'

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Jimmy Kamara, 9, is one of the students in Sierra Leone who use radios to continue their education while schools remain closed owing to Ebola. Tolu Bade/Courtesy of UNICEF hide caption

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Tolu Bade/Courtesy of UNICEF

Listen to one of the radio lessons

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Protective gloves dry out at a treatment center for Ebola patients in Lunsar, Sierra Leone, about 60 miles from the capital of Freetown. Although the Ebola epidemic is leveling off, new cases are still being reported. Courtesy of Joel Selanikio hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Selanikio

Death Becomes Disturbingly Routine: The Diary Of An Ebola Doctor

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Abu Bakarr Koroma is part of a condom handout program to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. These days, he can't even give 'em away. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The Prostitutes Are Not Happy. Neither Are Brides. Sex, Love And Ebola

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