Demonstrators hold placards that read "Withdraw Marine Corps" during a rally against the US military presence in Naha, Okinawa prefecture on Sunday, following the alleged rape and murder of a local woman by a former U.S. marine employed on the U.S. military base. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators gather in a silent rally to mourn the death of an Okinawa woman in front of Camp Zukeran on May 22. The crime is thrusting the opposition to the U.S. presence on Okinawa back in the spotlight. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

As President Visits Japan, Okinawa Controversy Is Back In The Limelight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479269436/479502088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Okinawa Gov. Hirokazu Nakaima speaks Friday at a news conference in Naha, Japan, in which he announced his approval of landfill work for the relocation of the U.S. military's Futenma air base within his prefecture, walking back his pledge to move the base off Okinawa. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kyodo /Landov