Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng during a ceremony in January where he was presented the Tom Lantos Human Rights Prize. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Chinese legal activist Chen Guangcheng, center, arrives at Washington Square Village on the campus of New York University on Saturday in New York. Chen escaped from his village in April and was given sanctuary inside the U.S. Henny Ray Abrams/AP hide caption

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Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton during a news conference in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Saturday (March 5, 2012). Munir Uz Zaman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Clinton Hopes To Soon Welcome Chinese Activist Chen To The U.S.
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Chen Guangcheng, left, with U.S. Ambassador Gary Locke on Tuesday at the U.S. embassy in Beijing. State Department hide caption

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Louisa Lim, reporting on 'Morning Edition'
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Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng (in wheelchair) held the hand of Gary Locke (at right) the U.S. ambassador to China in Beijing as he arrived at a hospital in Beijing on Wednesday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chen speaks with NPR
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Chinese activist activist Chen Guangcheng earlier today at the a hospital in Beijing. He reportedly injured himself during his escape from house arrest last month. Jordan Pouille /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition'
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Blind activist Chen Guangcheng with his wife and son outside their home in northeast China's Shandong province in 2005. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louisa Lim reporting
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