A woman carries a bucket of water on her head on the streets of capital city Bamako during the rainy season in Mali. Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Corbis via Getty Images

The Rainy Season Strategy To Stop Malaria

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Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi looks on during an appearance at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, on Aug. 22, at the start of his trial on charges of involvement in the destruction of historic mausoleums in the Malian desert city of Timbuktu. Mahdi pleaded guilty. Patrick Post/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Post/AFP/Getty Images

A soldier of the United Nations mission to Mali stands guard near a UN vehicle after it drove over an explosive device near Kidal, northern Mali, on July 14. Souleymane Ag Anara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Souleymane Ag Anara/AFP/Getty Images

Handout picture dated 1997 and released in 2012 by the UN shows ancient manuscripts displayed at the library in the city of Timbuktu. Al-Qaeda has destroyed ancient texts it considers idolatrous. Evan Schneider/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Evan Schneider/AFP/Getty Images

Timbuktu's 'Badass Librarians': Checking Out Books Under Al-Qaida's Nose

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An Ivorian soldier stands guard on March 18, 2016 at the site of a jihadist shooting rampage at the beach resort of Grand Bassam. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Ivory Coast Struggles To Keep Economy Afloat After Terror Attack

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The photographer brings a surreal touch to the epidemic that struck West Africa in photos titled "Le Temps Ebola." The suits worn by the people portraying health professionals evoke carnival masks and animal masks. The question the photographer ponders: "Are these figures here to protect the people or to harm them?," reflecting mistrust of medical workers in the early stages of the outbreak. Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou hide caption

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Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou

Two polio cases have been reported in Ukraine, where some parents are fearful of vaccinations. Above: A child receives the diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus vaccine in a children's hospital in Kiev. Sergei Chuzavkov/AP hide caption

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Sergei Chuzavkov/AP

A town crier rides his moped through the city of Kayes in Mali, using his megaphone to warn people about Ebola. Nick Loomis/Courtesy of Global Post hide caption

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Nick Loomis/Courtesy of Global Post

Mali Already Has An Ebola Cluster: Can The Virus Be Stopped?

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The media is all over this story: Ebola in NYC! Don Weiss, a doctor with the New York City Health Department, faces microphones outside the bowling alley visited by the physician who tested positive for the virus. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP