Martin County relies on a water treatment plant that was built in 1968. Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource hide caption

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Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource

Kentucky Community Hopes Trump Infrastructure Plan Will Fix Water System

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Members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and their supporters gather in a circle to hear speakers and singers at a protest encampment last month near Cannon Ball, N.D. Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A government watchdog's report says Flint residents' exposure to lead in city drinking water could have been stopped months earlier by federal regulators. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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The interior of the Flint water plant is seen on Sept. 14 in Flint, Mich. The city is still struggling to replace thousands of corroded lead pipes that tainted drinking water. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Year Since Water Crisis Began, Flint Struggles In Pipe Replacement Efforts

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For months, Security, Colo., resident Brenda Piontkowski has regularly visited this vending station to collect drinking water for her family. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

Chemicals In Drinking Water Prompt Inspections Of U.S. Military Bases

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The Flint River in downtown Flint, Mich. The state's attorney general, Bill Schuette, announced felony and misdemeanor charges Friday against six state employees in connection with the lead-contamination of the city's drinking water Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Pilot tests discovered high levels of lead in three water fountains at this school on Chicago's South Side. The fountains were shut down and replaced with water coolers. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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High Lead Levels Discovered In Chicago School's Drinking Fountains

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Chicago's North Broadway Street has been undergoing water main upgrades in the past few weeks, with more work scheduled this year. The upgrades are part of the city's 10-year plan to replace 900 miles of water pipes. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Chicago's Upgrades To Aging Water Lines May Disturb Lead Pipes

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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago

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The village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., sits along the Hoosick River in eastern New York. Elevated levels of a suspected carcinogen known as PFOA were found in the village's well water, which is now filtered. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Elevated Levels Of Suspected Carcinogen Found In States' Drinking Water

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