A team of blacksmiths, welders, artists and scientists have been working together in Canada to mount the T. rex bones without damaging them. Metal cradles hold 150 of the major bones precisely in place. Research Casting International hide caption

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'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose

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The Smithsonian's Jon Blundell scans the fossilized foot bone — the metatarsal — of the Wankel T. rex to help create a digital 3-D image of the long-dead dinosaur. Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post hide caption

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America's T. Rex Gets A Makeover

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Reconstruction of Deinocheirus mirificus. Yuong-Nam Lee/Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources hide caption

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Bigger Than A T. Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

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Workers at the National Geographic Museum in Washington grind the rough edges off a life-size replica of a spinosaurus skeleton. Mike Hettwer/National Geographic hide caption

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Crocodile Meets Godzilla — A Swimming Dino Bigger Than T. Rex

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