Scientists in California are turning to big data to help save the red-legged frog, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Gary Kittleson hide caption

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Using Algorithms To Catch The Sounds Of Endangered Frogs

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For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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Green when young, and about the size of an adult human's hand when full-grown, Dryococelus australis is more commonly known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect, or the tree lobster. Courtesy of Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo hide caption

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Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink

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Bull trout are running out of time in Montana as their traditional waters heat up, biologists say. By moving more than 100 fish to higher elevations, fisheries scientists hope to save the species by seeding a new population in waters that will stay cooler longer. Jim Mogen/USFWS hide caption

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Scientists Try Radical Move To Save Bull Trout From A Warming Climate

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A black-footed ferret looks out of a crate during a release of 30 of the animals at a former toxic waste site, now a wildlife refuge in suburban Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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A pangolin is released into the wild by officials at a conservation forest in Indonesia in 2013. The animal was among 128 pangolins confiscated by customs officers from a smuggler's boat off Sumatra. Jefri Tarigan/AP hide caption

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The World's Most Trafficked Mammal Is One You May Never Have Heard Of

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In this image taken from a November 2012 video, Cecil the lion is shown in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. Paula French via AP hide caption

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Death Of Beloved Lion Heats Up Criticism Of Big Game Hunting

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Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. Credit: Bryan Orford Bryan Orford/YouTube hide caption

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Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

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The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water. Robert Galbraith /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate

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Numbat populations once dropped as low as 500 adults. To help save this endangered marsupial, the Perth Zoo has been rearing them in captivity for release back into the wild. But wild numbats eat only termites, which are too difficult to get in large quantities. So zoo staff have spent over a decade concocting a tasty and nutritious substitute. Helenabella via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened. AP hide caption

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Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

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A manatee swims underwater in the springs of Crystal River, Fla. — home to a group of residents who have sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, demanding that the agency consider removing the animals from the endangered species list. Amanda Cotton/iStockphoto hide caption

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Florida's Manatees: Big, Beloved And Bitterly Contested

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Off the coast of Southern California, a crowd watches a blue whale rise to the surface earlier this summer. A new study says the population of blue whales off the West Coast is close to historic levels. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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