A Trump rally in held in New York City on March 4. The issue of conflicts of interest doesn't seem to be registering much among President Trump's supporters. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Among Trump Supporters, Conflicts Of Interest Aren't A Top Concern

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics shared these statistics related to the nominee transition process with NPR under the Freedom of Information Act. U.S. Office of Government Ethics/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics/Screenshot by NPR

In the White House's letter to the Office of Government Ethics this week, there's something potentially far more interesting than the administration's response to Kellyanne Conway's Nordstrom comments. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Experts Say White House's Conway Response Raises Major Ethical Questions

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Federal conflict-of-interest laws require officials like commerce secretary nominee Wilbur Ross (right) to divest holdings, but President Trump is not covered by those requirements. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethics Watchdog Has Big Impact On Federal Workers, But Not On Trump

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International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde (from left), Jose Ugaz of Transparency International, Daria Kaleniuk of the Anti-Corruption Action Center, and Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg participate in a panel discussion at the Anti-Corruption Summit in London in May 2016. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Trump's Conflicts Could Undercut Global Efforts To Fight Corruption, Critics Say

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President Trump today at the White House. The New York attorney general says Democratic AGs are considering challenging state corporate charters of the president's businesses. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump (hidden at left) have dinner with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his wife, Akie, at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 10. Trump said he would personally pay for the visit to his resort . Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Critics Say Trump Group Doing New Foreign Deals, Despite Pledge To Refrain

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Adam Scott of Australia plays during the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship at the Trump National Doral Blue Monster course in 2016. David Cannon/Getty Images hide caption

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Many groups are raising questions about President Trump's conflicts of interest, but do they have the "standing" to challenge him in court? Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Can Groups Sue Over Trump's Business Conflicts Even If They Weren't Harmed?

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Rep. Tom Price, nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary, faced questions about his investments in health care companies during a confirmation hearing on Wednesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., (right) and Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., get settled before the start of Price's confirmation hearing Wednesday before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York on Wednesday, during which he discussed plans to shift management of his businesses to his sons. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Donald Trump appeared with Setya Novanto, then speaker of the House of Representatives of Indonesia, at Trump Tower in New York in September 2015. Novanto resigned from his political post in December 2015 after corruption accusations. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Trump Business Deals In Southeast Asia Raise Conflict Of Interest Concerns

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Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka Trump, have played key roles in Donald Trump's campaign, his transition team and his family businesses. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Trump Relatives' Potential White House Roles Could Test Anti-Nepotism Law

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President-elect Donald Trump is expected to hold a news conference on Jan. 11 to address conflicts of interest, though an adviser said the date might shift. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Prominent Trump Backers Sign Letter Pushing To End Conflicts Of Interest

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The recently opened Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., is just one of several businesses that could pose a conflict of interest for President-elect Donald Trump as he prepares to take office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Ethics Expert: Trump's Efforts To Address Conflicts Are 'Baby Steps'

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Walter Shaub Jr. is the director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, which tweeted last month about President-elect Donald Trump's conflicts of interest. U.S. Office of Government Ethics hide caption

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U.S. Office of Government Ethics

U.S. Ethics Chief Was Behind Those Tweets About Trump, Records Show

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